Floating cities: what’s next?

The first floating city in the world won’t be built in a day. What should be the next step to get there? That’s what we asked ourselves during a strategy brainstorm* at De Ceuvel**, a workspace for social enterprises and sustainable urban development.

The answer? Surprisingly we all agreed on the same thing: we believe the next step to a floating city should be to build a small floating hub where people can see and experience the blue revolution. The size of the floating hub could start at four m2 including a tiny home or workspace plus a small floating farm next to it to grow food and algae.

Since we cannot do this alone, we want to realize this next step together with our expert network, and possibly with you? Right now we are working on a business plan for this idea which could include a crowd funding campaign, so we’ll definitely keep you posted.

* With special thanks to Vicky Lin, a delta technology enthusiast from Taiwan, and Corey Ching, a software engineer from the San Fransisco Bay Area. We are really proud to have you on the team!

** Listen to the playlist of that day to get a feel of De Ceuvel, highly recommended.

De Ceuvel I

De Ceuvel II

 

First floating hotel in Paris

On June 23rd Paris opened it’s first floating hotel located on the river Seine, near the Pont Charles de Gaulle. Above you can see how the €11 million floating hotel – constructed in Normandy – is being towed down the river from Rouen to it’s current location.

The hotel is realised by Citysurfing, their website offers an interesting overview of the history of the project. If you want to know how what the hotel looks like today, check out this photo gallery.

If you’re heading up there, we would love to see pictures on how the light reflects the water during the day. And of course get to know more on how sustainable the design is. Merci!

Source image: @OffParisSeine

4th International Symposium on Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

On October 25th and 26th, the 4th International OTEC Symposium will be held in the Netherlands, hosted by Delft University of Technology and by the Offshore Energy Exhibition 2016.

The symposium gathers the world’s expertise on offshore technologies and attracts worldwide experts from public, private and academia on OTEC development and implementation.The program will be announced soon. Its focus will be on the commercial development of the energy, to bridge the gap between possibility and reality.

Get Early Bird Tickets*

*Attendance to the symposium includes free entrance to the Offshore Energy Exhibition 2016 (with over 11,865 visitors in 2015).

Ocean thermal energy conversion
Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a one of the few continuously available sources of renewable energy and holds enormous promise for coastal regions and islands. The core idea of OTEC is to leverage the temperature difference between deep and shallow seawater to produce electricity. It provides not only energy but also desalinized water for human and agricultural consumption, thus solving two of the most important problems of maritime habitats.

schematic ocean thermal3

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