First floating hotel in Paris

On June 23rd Paris opened it’s first floating hotel located on the river Seine, near the Pont Charles de Gaulle. Above you can see how the €11 million floating hotel – constructed in Normandy – is being towed down the river from Rouen to it’s current location.

The hotel is realised by Citysurfing, their website offers an interesting overview of the history of the project. If you want to know how what the hotel looks like today, check out this photo gallery.

If you’re heading up there, we would love to see pictures on how the light reflects the water during the day. And of course get to know more on how sustainable the design is. Merci!

Source image: @OffParisSeine

One World Water wondered: who will live on floating cities?

According to the Dutch water pioneers Frits Schoute and Rutger de Graaf floating cities will be a reality within twenty years. One World Water interviewed both of them and wondered: who will be the first men and women living at sea?

Rutger de Graaf: “According to a survey two third of the people in the Netherlands are open to the idea of living on the water. The intention is specifically that it won’t only attract the rich. Maybe this will happen in the beginning, but that shouldn’t be a problem. Mobile phones were also used by a small group of early adapters. Because of that, phones could be further developed so the price dropped. The idea of a floating city is that it will offer different types of housing: social housing, apartments and detached housing.”

“Also, a water plot is slightly cheaper than a land plot, and though the construction is a bit more expensive, in the end living on water it will cost about the same as on land.”

Read full article (in Dutch)

Source image:


Seasteading and Society: the Millennial March Back to the Sea

In our daily work we encounter different visions on why floating cities should be or not be our next frontier. Based on the vision and mission of The Seasteading Institute, Andrew Morgan – a Media Studies Major student – also truly believes living and working at sea is the future: “An untapped venture, where we will eventually be headed. I also believe that millennials will be the ones who help make this a reality and kick it into high gear.”

Read the blog via Medium

Image: Storm Makes Sense of Shelter, submitted by Simon Nummy (Atkins) at the Architectural Design Contest held by The Seasteading Institute and Deltasync



This floating villa is real

‘Dubai’s crazy awesome floating villas now exist in real life’. That was the heading on Huffington Post this month. At first they were a little bit skeptical, because ‘the rendered photos looked too good to be true’. So were we, but it is. Here’s a video of the construction of the floating Seahorse. You can find more pictures and video’s here.

We think this is a very interesting example of floating development, because it provides a habitat both for humans as well as for life below the water surface. We’re really curious to see how the artificial coral reef will evolve and how nature beneath and above the water surface will respond to the villa. So we would advice to have this monitored and researched to further improve floating development with a positive impact on our planet.

Floating Seahorse II

Credits photos: Kleindienst

Quote wondered: what happened since 2011?

Quote – a Dutch magazine on business and lifestyle – wondered what happened to the entrepreneurs who pitched their business five years ago. Amongst them was our architect Bart Roeffen who pitched for DeltaSync

Bart: “We raised the money we needed to do research, but our pitch was actually very naive. We asked to invest in a concept, but investors want to invest in a product. Or in our case, in a real estate project on a specific location. Our company DeltaSync is doing really well though. We raised funds and work for several cities in the Netherlands and abroad.”

The timing of the pitch five years ago had to do with the Floating Pavilion in the Rijnhaven in Rotterdam, realized by DeltaSync. Bart: “That was a great succes because that was at the time when people were getting more aware of climate change. We wanted to take advantage of this momentum. We noticed quite quickly though that there were a lot of obstacles due to Dutch laws and regulations. Thats why we focused on other countries as well, where there are huge possibilities.”

“Overall, I’m still convinced that we have to look at the possibilities on the water, because we are devastating the earth right now. And with that I don’t mean land reclamation like in Dubai, which is irresponsible from a ecological point of view.”

Bart concludes with an interesting fact for potential investors: “Right now building on the water is 10% to 20% more expensive, but this is largely compensated by the price of water plots, which is lower than the price of land.”

Foto Bart Quote II

Credits text & photo Quote-article: Sander Schimmelpenninck & Aafke Holwerda

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