Alternative offshore energy storage being investigated

Wind farms and solar-energy plants produce free energy, but the availability can change from minute to minute. In order to be able to compete with more traditional forms of energy production it is important to store surpluses on a large-scale for times of scarcity. Pumped storage, as it is called, was until recently, dependant on convenient geography to be built and done so on a two-reservoir-model. Two individual projects are investigating how to adapt the principle of pumped storage to cheap and reliable systems in order to smooth the output of energy and to become large-scale contributors to power generation.

The first project has been running for a year in Toronto, Canada and is situated at the bottom of Lake Ontorio. Compressed air is pumped to a storage vessel 55 metres below the surface of the water where it is stored in spherical bags made by proprietary material. When energy is needed, the air is released to the onshore plant, its expansion there back to normal pressure drives a turbine.

In Germany the StEnSea system (Storing Energy at Sea) has been launced at a depth of 100 metres in Lake Constance. Rather than storing compressed air, this system uses water to pump energy to and from a series of concrete pressure vessels, turning turbines as it travels.

In The Economist an interesting article about both projects and their expected storage capacity.

Image source: © HOCHTIEF Solutions – Storing Energy at Sea

Hawaii surf is generating renewable energy

Hawaii is famous for its surfing and legendary waves that attract surfers from all over the world. The American state situated in the Pacific Ocean is testing how they can use these very waves to produce renewable energy that will power homes on the islands.

For this trial two wave turbine machines have been placed in the waters of the Kaneohe Bay. The machines, installed by the U.S. Navy, have been producing enough energy to power around a dozen homes, but the expectation is that future versions will be be able to supply hundreds of homes with renewable energy.

Upworthy.com posted an interesting article on the subject.

Image source:Northwest Energy Innovations

Seasteading delegation present proposal to Polynesian President

An international team of seasteading delegates travelled to Tahiti where they had the opportunity to meet with the Polynesian President Édouard Fritch and several other government officials. There they formally presented a proposal for a seastead in the waters surrounding the Pacific Island.  Blue21 co-founder Bart Roeffen was one of the nine team members who travelled to Tahiti to share his ideas on realizing sustainable floating islands in French Polynesia.

The Seasteading Institute wrote a blog on this extraordinary trip.

Image: Seasteading.org

Inverse explores sustainable development in Rotterdam

Online magazine Inverse investigates why the city of Rotterdam has stopped fighting the ongoing battle with water and decided to embrace the opportunities that water-based development creates for the future. Freelance journalist Lauren Razavi interviews Blue21 co-founder and director of project development at DeltaSync, Karina Czapiewska about her vision on urban environments in response to current challenges such as climate change and urban growth.

“We realized we have to look differently at how we develop our urban environments for future residents” Czapiewska explains. “Populations are growing and cities have to grow with them. Our concept is less destruction and more innovation, for the benefit of the next generation.”

The Floating Pavilion which was initiated by DeltaSync, is just one example of innovative design that characterizes Rotterdam’s architecture. Both the Head of Urban Planning for the City of Rotterdam, Mattijs van Ruijven and spokesperson for the Port of Rotterdam Authority Sjaak Poppe, share how the local government is working together with architects, artists, developers, entrepreneurs and community groups to combat climate change and reduce CO₂ emissions while continuing to develop innovative projects like the Floating Pavilion.

Read the full article on Inverse.com

Image: www.nudgesustainabilityhub.com

Could you live 100% sustainably off the water?

If so, then a Major Television Production Company is looking for you!

Do you have the skill sets and knowledge of what it would take to live 100% sustainably off the water? Are you interested in actually trying to do so for an extended period of time? If so, we want to hear from you!

A Major Television Production Company is searching for people who want to live 100% off of the ocean. They want to find people who are PASSIONATE about developing new ways for mankind to sustainably live off of the ocean long term.

For more information about the project and to speak with the casting producer, please email [email protected] with your contact information, a photo and a brief description of yourself.

 

Image: spatial concept Markerwadden by Blue21